Category Archives: Lake District

Catbells in pictures

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I was just going through my holiday pictures and realised I never blogged about my trip up Catbells, so here it is in pictures!

I do not think much about cats, but I did like Catbells! Catbells is a family friendly fell in the Lake District. Overlooking Keswick and Derwent water, it has a height of 451m, making it a very popular fell to tourists. We should have walked up Coniston Old Man, but unfortunately the fog came in.  The decision was made to walk up this smaller fell, which ended up being a pawsome choice!

Making our way up to Catbells - sure this was a catch your breath moment.

Making our way up to Catbells – sure this was a catch your breath moment.

HuDad and me taking in the views over Derwent water. HuMum is sure HuDad has a bald patch developing!

HuDad and me taking in the views over Derwent water. HuMum is sure HuDad has a bald patch developing!

The summit of Catbells can be seen in the background.

The summit of Catbells can be seen in the background.

Catbells summit - 360 degree view point.

Catbells summit – 360 degree view point.

Looking back along the path we walked up.

Looking back along the path we walked up.

I would love to hear if you have walked up Catbells – leave me a comment on the blog or twoof me @rubys_rambles on Twitter.

*waggy tail*

Ruby Dog x

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“…I began a life long love affair with a pile of rock”

Coniston Old Man

The Old Man of Coniston

“…I began a life long love affair with a pile of rock.”

Edward Abbey

I have “bagged” a few mountains, as they say. It is one of my most favourite things being out in the fresh air, sniffing here and there! There is always a guarantee of a treat for me at the summit! Here is my list of those mountains bagged so far…

  1. Snowdon – Wales.
  2. Moel Hebog – Wales.
  3. Red Screes – England.
  4. Catbells – England.
  5. Skelgill Bank – England.
  6. The Old Man of Coniston – England.
  7. Brim Fell – England.
  8. Pen y Fan – Wales.
  9. Corn Du – Wales.
  10. Cribyn – Wales.
  11. Fan y Big – Wales.

I would love to hear what your favourite mountain is to walk up – let me know by leaving a comment on my blog or twoof me @rubys_rambles on Twitter.

*waggy tail*

Ruby Dog x

Lake District – Rydal

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Route Information

Distance: 2.5 miles

Time: 2 hours

Grade: Medium

This is a great circular walk, with breath taking scenery across Rydal, a stunning cave and plenty of water –  a real treat for water loving dogs!

My humans parked at the pay and display White Moss car park (A591 from Ambleside – located on the left hand side of the road). Heading to the furthest end of the car park, we took the main path with the river running to the left of us. HuMum let me off the lead from here. The humans walked over the wooden bridge on the left, but I decided to paddle across the river. I sniffed out a trail via the woods and went through the kissing gate. Walking up hill, we come to a fork in the path.

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The lower Rydal water shore path.

There are two paths that run left to the lake – one lower path close to the lake shore, the other taking the higher ground. We chose the higher path overlooking the valley, which took us to some awe-inspiring caves.

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Rydal “Cathedral” cave.

The National Trust have put a barrier up with a safety warning, but most people ignore this (don’t say I told you – you enter at your own risk!). I chose to swim into the cave, also nicknamed the “Cathedral”, the Humans did not want to get wet, so took the stepping stone route.

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Swimming in Rydal cave.

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Stepping stones from the cave.

There is also a second smaller cave just along the path.  The caves were once slate quarries, providing roofing tiles to the local area.

From the caves we followed the track down hill, making our descent to Rydal Water. As we got closer to the lake, some fellow humans were commenting about my nice coat and that I looked very slim, compared to their Labrador. Just as HuMum was telling them “Ruby adores swimming in the water”,  I was gone and in the lake before she even finished her sentence!

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Wild swimming in Rydal water.

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The Rydal water monster!

I loved the water, running in and out, splashing and swimming! The views were just breath taking.

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Chillin’ out lake side style!

You can take the lower path, with the lake on your right back to the White Moss car park from where the walk is started. However, on this occasion we had to retrace our steps, as the lower path was closed for some essential maintenance.

I really want to come back to this area again. I have already been thinking about a walkies itinerary for the humans – you can take a path up to Loughrigg Fell (one of the Wainwright’s) and on the other side of Rydal water is the “Coffin” route – sounds freaky!

Have you walked this route? Do you have any suggestions for walks in the Lake District – feel free to leave me a comment on the blog below.

*Waggy tail*

Ruby Dog x

 

 

Lake District – Red Screes

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Tarn at the Summit of Red Screes

Route Information

Distance: 1.5 miles

Time: 2 hours

Grade: Medium

This walk up to Red Screes was arranged a bit last minute, due to a “no rain” window.  A simple up – down.  My human’s parked up at the Kirkstone Pass car park in the Lake District, opposite The Kirkstone Pass Inn.  This old coaching inn is the third highest public house in England.

Heading towards the North end of the car park, we went through the gate (I went under it) and followed the path upwards!

View across to Windemere

View across to Windemere

The route looks quite daunting from the bottom, but actually it is quite straight forward to follow. It is a “steppy” route and my human’s had to take a break now and then, as it was quite steep in places. In the words of my human “Just need a moment to catch my breath!”

 

Hurry up!

Hurry up!

Eventually the route eases with grassy slopes up to the summit cairn of Red Screes. I got my human’s to do the obligatory touch the cairn and take photos of me at the summit to prove it.

Red Screes summit cairn

Red Screes summit cairn

This is one of my favourite summits so far, the views were just pawsome and had the bonus of a tarn to paddle in. We had a paws for a drink, followed by a scamper and a sniff around the summit. We bumped into a very nice man, who told us that he had climbed all 214 Wainwright’s with his wife and explained which Mountains’ were currently around us. We had a view of the Coniston fells, Helvellyn and the Scafells to name a few. I was just thinking I have another 210 Wainwright’s to bag.

Tarn on top of Red Screes

Tarn on top of Red Screes

We made our descent back down the route we came up and headed to The Kirkstone Pass Inn for a much needed drink, before returning to our holiday cottage.

Useful resources:

The Kirkstone Pass Inn

*Waggy tail*

Ruby Dog x

 

 

Tarn Hows

Walking down to Tarn Hows from the car park

Walking down to Tarn Hows from the car park

Route Information

Distance: 2 miles

Time: 1 hour

Grade: Easy

Tarn Hows is a lovely circular walk amongst the trees and following the waters edge around the tarn.  It is also popular with other dogs and their humans. We parked at the National Trust car park (pay and display – members free).  Make sure you get your humans to take your lead, as between two gates is a cattle grazing area.

We walked the path opposite the car park into Tarn Hows.  The downhill path heads towards the lake, where I let my fur down and had a paddle.

View through woodland to the tarn

View through woodland to the tarn

We went through the gate on the left and followed the gentle hills through the woods, keeping the tarn on the right.  After passing through a second gate (at this point my humans put the lead on – got to follow the doggy rules!), we followed the well-marked path round and crossed a footbridge.  It’s worth noting the stunning views across the tarn.

Stunning views across the tarn

Stunning views across the tarn

Me and Tarn Hows

Me and Tarn Hows

After passing through a further gate, we rambled up the path on the right and then the path on the left back to the car park.

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Path returning to car park

A walk I would recommend if your are looking for a short circular!

Useful resources to check out:

National Trust

*waggy tail*

Ruby x